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Admissions

What do we want to shout proudly about?

  1. We're the first Hampshire school to be accredited with the National Literacy Award. This means that we teach reading and writing really well.
  2. We received the Institute of Education Every Child a Reader School of the year, national award in July 2016.
  3. Our phonic check results in the Year One tests are above national results over time.
  4. Our progress in reading, writing and maths is outstanding. Attainment shows that pupils catch up by 7 years old from lower than typical starting points.
  5. Ofsted 2013 says that the standard of behaviour in our school is outstanding

What can we offer your child and your family?
  1. Small class sizes throughout the school (range 20-25) with a teaching assistant in each year group
  2. A specialist reading teacher in the school and nationally approved interventions in reading, writing and maths for those children who have special educational needs
  3. Outstanding leadership to make improvements each year in the school so that your child benefits from the best
  4. Free school meals for all children to ensure that their long term health is promoted by a balanced diet

 

If you would like your child to attend our school, please see full details of our admission arrangements below.

 

Getting it right from the start is important. Starting a new school can be a significant event for a child and family.

 

Please make an appointment to meet with the Head of School and tour the schools. No pupil will be admitted without a pre meeting to agree an individual induction plan and starting date.

 

Please refer to the Home-School Agreement to understanding the responsibilities we will all have to play at the start of this partnership.

When you choose your child's school its important to consider -

What does Ofsted judge the school to be like?
How recent was the inspection report? Is it likely that things will have changed since it was written?
For example, has there been a change of headteacher?

What do the school's published results tell you about how well children learn at the school?

How welcome do staff make you feel on the phone and when you visit the school?
Did you and your child feel safe on site?
Did you see confident, happy children working alongside adults and other children?

Did the school displays and classrooms look exciting, bright and cheerful?
Would you want to be a 4 year old in the school?
Look at the school's prospectus through the eyes of your child...does it make you want to join the team?

What sorts of clubs does the school offer?
Does it have a breakfast club or after school club?
How often do children experience offsite visits to enrich their learning in school?

How many children are attending the school every day? Is the school's attendance figure above the national level set at 95%?

How large are the class sizes?
Is your child going to be in a large or small class?
How many teaching assistants does the school employ alongside the teachers?

How well does the school with other partner schools?
Does it lead training for other schools?

How comprehensive is the induction programme?
Will your child get opportunities to meet the teachers during the year?
Does the school offer home visits for your family and visits to your child's preschool?

Family Dining (Lunch Provision)

 

All children will experience family dining at Springwood Infant School and be served ‘hot dinners’ daily. This is to ensure that we meet our accountability to provide a well-balanced meal for your child. It is great value for money (costing £380 per child) and will save you the considerable expense of providing a packed lunch.

Letters in relation to this item can be obtained from the school office.

Safeguarding

 

Designated Safeguarding Lead  responsibilities

  •  Mrs Susan Underwood

 

Deputies DSL:

  • Mrs Jen Thornton (Head of School Infant)
  • Mrs Jo Livingstone (Head of School Junior)

 

Local Authority designated Officer (LADO) is Barbara Piddington: Tel 01962 876364

 

We recognise our moral and statutory responsibility to safeguard and promote the welfare of all children.

We make every effort to provide a safe and welcoming environment underpinned by a culture of openness where both children and adults feel secure, able to talk and believe that they are being listened to.

We maintain an attitude of “it could happen here” where safeguarding is concerned.

The purpose of this is to provide staff, volunteers and governors with the framework they need in order to keep children safe and secure in our school and to inform parents and guardians how we will safeguard their children whilst they are in our care.

Please refer to the full policy for further information.

Sex and Relationships (Junior age children)

The underlying principles of the policy are:

  • all sex and relationships education (SRE) work should be seen as a key part of prevention and early intervention and sit within the wider health and wellbeing agenda
  • keeping children and young people safe and protecting them from abuse, in line with the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (see appendix 3) and safeguarding procedures (see appendix 7)
  • enabling children and young people to make their own informed choices in maintaining relationships and sexual health

Children Looked After (Children in Care)

The term Children Looked After has a specific legal meaning based on the Children Act. A child is looked after by a local authority if he or she has been provided with accommodation for a continuous period of more than 24 hours, in the circumstances set out in sections 20 and 21 of the Children Act 1989, or is placed in the care of a local authority by virtue of an order made under part IV of the Act.

 

The majority of children who are looked after by the local authority are placed with foster carers as it is believed to be best for children to live within a family environment. For some children however, residential care may be more appropriate.

Dealing with allegations against Staff & Safer Working Practice

All schools have procedures for dealing with allegations against staff.

  • The procedures  make it clear that all allegations should be reported straight away, normally to the Head Teacher, principal or proprietor if it is an independent school.
  • The procedures should also identify the person, often the chair of governors, to whom reports should be made in the absence of the Head Teacher or principal, or in cases where the Head Teacher or principal themselves are the subject of the allegation or concern.
  • Procedures should also include contact details for the local authority designated officer (LADO) responsible for providing advice and monitoring cases.

Dealing with allegations of a child protection nature against the Headteacher

Concerns or allegations of a child protection nature made against the Headteacher should be dealt with by a nominated member of the Governing Body. This will usually be the Chair of Governors. As Chair of Governors, or the nominated Governor for dealing with an allegation about the Headteacher, you will have a key role to play should an allegation be made to you.

 

Please refer to the policies for guidance.

Supporting Pupils With Medical Conditions

 

In April 2014 (updated September 2014) the DfE provided statutory guidance on "Supporting Pupils at School with Medical Conditions".   Most pupils will at some time have a medical condition that may affect their participation in school activities.  For many this will be short term; perhaps finishing a course of medication.

 

Other pupils have medical conditions that, if not properly managed, could limit their access to education.  Such pupils are regarded as having medical needs.

 

Supporting a child with a medical condition during school hours is not the sole

responsibility of one person. Our schools’ ability to provide effective support will depend to an appreciable extent on working cooperatively with other agencies. Partnership working between school staff, healthcare professionals (and where appropriate, social care professionals), local authorities, and parents and pupils will be critical, for e.g. School Nursing Service, Occupational Health Team, Local GP practices and Paediatricians.

 

For parents or guardians who have prime responsibility for their child’s health are to provide schools with information about their child’s medical condition. This could also include details in conjunction with their child’s GP or paediatrician, school doctor or specialist voluntary bodies who may be able to provide additional background for school staff.

 

For full details please refer to the DfE document and school policy below

Home Alone Guide

 

Did you know?

There is no legal age limit for leaving a child on their own, but it’s an offence to do so if it places them at risk. Parents can be prosecuted for neglect if they leave a child unsupervised “in a manner likely to cause unnecessary suffering or injury to health”

 

Check out the useful guidance below.

Remember the three Ws! (Junior aged children)

Even with older children, make sure that they always tell you who they are going out with, where they are going and when they will be back. If possible, get a phone number

where you can reach them.

 

Don’t over-protect your children. While it’s important for children to play in a safe area, they do need to be challenged once they are old enough and take risks in order to develop.

 

Springwood schools provide opportunities for pupils to take responsibility for their own actions. They learn to consider risks and modify their actions, learning about their world through hands on experiences which involve them to reflect when things don't go quite right. This allows them to learn about risks in a protected environment with reducing supervision so that they are ready to make simple, safe decisions whilst alone.

 

The school provides opportunities for pupils to learn skills such as water and bike safety throughout the curriculum. They learn respect for rules by working alongside local Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs).

 

Attendance

 

Every child has a right to access the education to which he/she is entitled. Parents and teachers share the responsibility for supporting and promoting excellent school attendance and punctuality for all.

It is our duty to consistently strive to achieve a goal of 100% attendance for all children. Every opportunity will be used to convey to pupils and their parents or carers the importance of regular and punctual attendance.

 

Make every day count for your child. Follow the guidance in the policy.

 

This school will refer late and absent pupils to the legal Attendance Board.

Hampshire Schools and Hampshire County Council will use the full range of legal measures to secure good attendance. Legal measures will only be considered through a referral to Hampshire’s Attendance Legal Panels where:

1. The child or family do not require the support from any agency to improve the attendance

2. The child has 10 or more sessions of unauthorised absence (5 or more days equivalent) and parents are complicit in the child’s absence.

The following legal measures are for pupils of compulsory school age who are registered at a school:

• Parenting contracts set at Education Planning Meetings

• Parenting orders

• Penalty notices

• Education Supervision Orders

• Prosecution

 

ATTENDANCE UPDATES FOR 2016-17

Headteachers may only authorise leave of absence in exceptional circumstances, these are defined as, 'rare, significant, unavoidable and short'.

 

Schools may only authorise absence through illness where medical evidence is provided if a pupil has an absence rate due to illness that is above the county average (2.4% for primary schools).

 

If your child's absence rate is above the county average you will be contacted to provide medical evidence of reason for absence.

Personal development, behaviour and welfare

Conduct we wish to encourage

We all need to have a common understanding of what good manners and conduct are so that we can work together. It also needs to be age appropriate across the whole primary range from 4-11 years. Conduct we encourage, support and develop are:

- Self-control, a sense of calm and patience;

- Respect for all adults, peers and property; appreciation of others irrespective of family background;

- Politeness;- the ability to listen well to adults and peers;

- The ability to express an opinion appropriately;

- The ability to reconcile any differences

- Understanding of others;

- Pride in achievement, academic and personal;

- Co-operation and collaboration;

- Personal tidiness and hygiene;

- Care for the environment inside and outside the classroom.

We must all work actively together to encourage and model good conduct.

The benefits of good social conduct and manners

For the children they need to know what is expected of them so that they can:

 Realise the importance of the way they behave and how it affects themselves, their peers, their parents and their teachers.

 Work in a calm and quiet atmosphere concentrating on their work free from disruption from others.

 Learn to care for each other and importance of friendship.

 Learn self-respect and develop self-confidence and increase their self-esteem.

 Learn to value effort and build resilience in their learning taking pride in their achievements and recognising the need to learn from mistakes.

 

Find out more in the policy. Help your child to become a responsible citizen.

Uniform Price List

The school uniform was adopted on 1st September 2012. The pupils helped to choose the colour of the  uniform  and design of the logo.

We wear a vibrant shade of emerald green sweatshirt/cardigan, white polo shirt (with or without a logo), with grey/black trousers, skirts, pinafores.

For PE the children will require a t-shirt, shorts and plimsoles in a PE bag which should be in school at all times.

Please can we ask all parents to ensure that the children's belongings are named. Thank you.

Please see current price list below:

We are proud that our pupils take pride in their work, their school and their appearance. Wearing their uniform helps them to gain a “sense of belonging”.

 

If they take pride in their own appearance they will take pride in their work and their achievements through life.

 

Help them to be a proud member of our successful schools.

Ofsted Reports

 

Please find below our most recent Ofsted reports, and relevant information from the Department for Education Performance Tables.

Springwood Infant School
Springwood Junior School

Pupil Premium

 

Please read the information below which gives details of our Pupil Premium Grant and how we allocate the funding.

 

Over time, half of our pupils are eligible for pupil premium funding which means they are in low income families. This places them at a higher risk of not achieving and reaching their full potential

 

How well did disadvantaged pupils achieve in 2014 as a result of the pupil premium funding that the school receives?

 

The PPG funding secured improved outcomes for all pupils in the school, in addition to the targeted disadvantaged pupils. This is because school leaders prioritise the funding to improve the quality of teaching for all through staff development, whilst investing in quality assured nationally accredited interventions with proven track records of effectiveness.

Please read the information below which gives details of our Pupil Premium Grant and how we allocate the funding.

By the end of Year 1

More than half of our pupils (17/27) were eligible for pupil premium funding which means they are in low income families. This places them at a higher risk of not achieving and reaching their full potential.

84% all year 1 pupils passed the decoding check 2014 above the national figures of 74%, 94% of disadvantaged pupils achieved this expected standard compared with 63% nationally.

 

Disadvantaged pupils achieved better in the phonic decoding check in 2014 than their non-disadvantaged classmates in the school; 94% compared with 75%. This is because a number of non-disadvantaged pupils were registered as having special educational needs. (SEN)

 

By the end of Year 2

Half of our pupils (20/40) were eligible for pupil premium funding which means they are in low income families. This places them at a higher risk of not achieving and reaching their full potential.

Writing:

Disadvantaged pupils are 10 months behind their non-disadvantaged classmates in school in writing and 4 months behind non disadvantaged peers nationally. This is because the non-disadvantaged pupils at the school are out performing national pupils so the gap is greater for disadvantaged pupils to catch up with others in the school.

They are 4 months ahead of disadvantaged pupils nationally. 

Reading:

Disadvantaged pupils are 8 months behind their non-disadvantaged classmates in school in reading and 4 months behind non disadvantaged peers nationally. This is because the non-disadvantaged pupils at the school are out performing national pupils so the gap is greater for disadvantaged pupils to catch up with others in the school.

They are 3 months ahead of disadvantaged pupils nationally. 

Maths:

Disadvantaged pupils are 11 months behind their non-disadvantaged classmates in school in maths and 6 months behind non disadvantaged peers nationally. This is because the non-disadvantaged pupils at the school are out performing national pupils so the gap is greater for disadvantaged pupils to catch up with others in the school.

They are broadly in line with disadvantaged pupils nationally. 

 

How well are disadvantaged pupils achieving over time?

 

Between 2013-4

 

In 2014 the achievement gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged pupils in the school widened. This is because although disadvantaged pupils achieved better in 2014 than in 2013, their non-disadvantaged classmates improved at a faster rate than they did.

 

Over, in all combined subjects, disadvantaged pupils are 10 months behind their classmates but approximately 5 months behind non disadvantaged pupils in other schools nationally. They are catching up other non-disadvantaged pupils across the country more quickly than those in the school so that they will have as many equal chances in the workforce as those more advantaged than themselves.

 

They have most to catch up in mathematics which continues to inform the focus of the school improvement plan and INSET programme.

 

How well do the most able disadvantaged pupils achieve over time?

 

In 2014 15% of disadvantaged pupils attained the highest level 3 grade in reading, 10% in writing and 10% in maths. Approximately 20-30% of non-disadvantaged pupils achieved these higher levels in the school and between 10-20% nationally, across all subjects. The gap was greatest in the percentage of pupils achieving the highest levels in maths across the school.

 

The school invites targeted pupils many of whom are disadvantaged pupils, to extend their school day and attend booster provision weekly. This catch up programme in the autumn term is designed to help pupils with the greatest distance to travel to achieve. In the spring term the school offers enrichment opportunities for its most able pupils to support them to achieve the highest levels too.

 

The 2015 results reflect a sustained achievement profile.

 

 

Attached are statutory documents:

 

School Budgetary Summary 2014 / 2015

Pupil Premium Reporting 2014 / 2015

Pupil Premium Reporting Proposal 2015 / 2016

Teaching Phonics

 

Our school uses the commercial scheme Letters and Sounds printed in 2008 to guide the teaching of phonics.

 

This synthetic phonics programme teachers letter sound correspondences in a specific order.

Children are taught to blend (put together) and segment (pull apart) words when they are reading and writing to help them. For example, c-a-t, sh-ee-p, r-ai-n. These are all words we expect children to be able to read by the end of their first year in school.

 

When 2 letters combine to make a new sound we call them digraphs, for example ch/th/sh or ai/ee/er

When 3 letters combine we call them trigraphs, for example igh/ear/ure

 

We expect children to be able to use these terms to describe words and notice letters and sounds to be able to use these in their spelling.

 

Some words do not follow simple rules and we refer to these as "tricky" words. For example, come/people. Children are taught to read and spell these noticing the part of the word that is irregular and doesn't follow the rule we would expect. Each year group has an expected list of tricky words which you can download under the curriculum section to guide your learning at home.

 

Follow the link to Letters and Sounds to learn more.

Our olympian visitor Rion Pierre. We're looking forward to meeting our next visitor in November 2015.

Our olympian visitor Rion Pierre.  We're looking forward to meeting our next visitor in November 2015. 1

SPORTS FUNDING

 

To make sure as many people as possible are playing sport, the government is:

  • funding Sport England, to help community sports grow, including helping 14- to 25-year-olds to keep playing sport throughout their lives
  • expanding the School Games programme to increase opportunities for more young people to play competitive sport
  • spending over £450 million on improving physical education (PE) and sport in primary schools over the 3 academic years from 2013 to 2014, 2014 to 2015 and 2015 to 2016.

The PE and sport premium is designed to help primary schools improve the quality of the PE and sport activities they offer their pupils.

Schools must use the funding to make additional and sustainable improvements to the quality of PE and sport they offer.

This means that you should use the premium to:

  • develop or add to the PE and sport activities that your school already offers
  • make improvements now that will benefit pupils joining the school in future years

 

Refer below for funding details

School Lunches

All children will experience family dining at Springwood Infant School and be served ‘hot dinners’ daily. This is to ensure that we meet our accountability to provide a well-balanced meal for your child. It is great value for money (costing £380 per child) and will save you the considerable expense of providing a packed lunch.

Policies

 

School policies cover every aspect of school life. Below are some of our most important policies for your reference. If you want to know our policy on something that is not listed, please ask the school office.

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